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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
's right. joe lieberman is conservative, a hawk, respected by some senators on foreign policy issues. there may be three republican senators who don't like her, another 97 who have votes, the house members who have been campaigning against her don't have votes. something chip said, it would be weird or odd for this process to be playing out if she is not going to be nominated as secretary of state. chip, it shows i think a real political premise on your part, and i think unfortunately shared by so much of your party here, she's a cabinet-level foreign policy person. so if you're serious about any of these issues, it shouldn't matter whether she's nominated or not. you should care about the substance of it. secondly, you and your party come to this debate with big deficit because you and president bush and dick cheney lied this country into war and you had a lot of lies on foreign policy about wmds. president bush even said once in may 2003 that we found the wmds in iraq. dick cheney and condoleezza rice talked about links to al qaeda in iraq. you've never made up for those huge, seri
the nature of the obama administration foreign policy is, paul. and susan rice in some ways encapsulates a strain in democratic policy thinking that goes way back, a story that's actually told by samantha power, a close aide to president obama and wrote about genocide in with a randa. and susan rice is state department that makes a cameo appearance in the book, quoted asking, if we call what happened in rwanda genocide, how does it play for us in what were then the mid term elections of 1994. well, there's a pattern here as we see. one is a reluctance to have america be engaged in certain issues, and the second one is politicizing foreign policy issues because they might hurt the president's political stance. >> paul: and you want a secretary of state, if you're-- well, the american people want a secretary of state who is some more independent judgment and not thinking so much about the politics, is that the point? >> that would be one thing that you would look for in the secretary of state. >> paul: sorry for stating the obvious. >> the national interests and not the president's mid ter
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foreign policy views. gwen: and he was close to chris stevens, the ambassador. >> i think there's a lot of personal feelings there. gwen: how much of it is about what the u.n. ambassador said on a talk show and how much of this is about what the intelligence department didn't do and what the state department didn't do? >> you're 100% right. i mean, i talked to republicans this week about this, and foreign policy expert republicans, who say why are we picking this fight? what we need to be asking is did the intelligence community decide to use the different language because they were playing politics, or did they not know? we've heard that general petraeus said that he immediately assumed that this was a terror attack from al qaeda. so the question is this republican said to me, why are we making this about her? this needs to be about something bigger that is actually bigger than susan rice. did we get it wrong? did we pay no attention to it because there was an election? i mean, those are very important issues that of course -- >> and didn't it feed those suspicions when after they had
, then they will disappear as a party. >> that is true. touren the pantheon of house republican foreign policy experts, representative louie gohmert is one of the most thoughtful and clear-eyed. ear is his explanation of why the president chose to intervene in libya. >> this administration sent planes and bombs and support to oust gadhafi so that al qaeda and the muslim brotherhood could take over libya. >> just so i understand this, the president agrees and issues the directive to go after osama bin laden, the head of al qaeda, so that al qaeda can take control of libya. >> facts don't live inside the conservative bubble. >> i know it's friday but -- >> we keep coming back to the same thing. maybe we'll talk about they start with a thesis of they hate obama. he's a horrible person -- >> but this gentleman is not a member of fox news. he's an elected congressman of the united states. >> well, as you know, there's ultimately no difference, right? they're in the same thought ecosystem, right? which is directed by the fox news, the rush limbaugh, the ann coulter what they say filters do unto the rank and
: in the 2008 campaign, she ridiculed hillary clinton's foreign policy experience and called john mccain "reckless and confused." if the president does nominate her, those who know her say she is more than up for the fight. although this would be a bruising battle, diane, i can tell you she would almost certainly have the votes to be confirmed. >> all right. jon karl reporting tonight. thank you, jon. >>> now we turn to the other battle brewing tonight, the clock is still ticking on the fiscal cliff. 35 days, taxes including on the middle class, will rise in america unless congress reaches a deal. abc senior white house correspondent jake tapper tells us the latest on this duel that would affect every single american family. >> reporter: the manufacturers of these angry birds building sets in pennsylvania will later this week be visited by president obama as he makes his case for raising tax rates on wealthier americans as part of a larger deal with congress. and while the president is not trying to provoke anger necessarily, he is trying to drum up passions for his proposal. meeting
's a problem with the photo op foreign policy with few real accomplishments and it's becoming more apparent to people around the world. >> gregg: we also supply aid to the palestinians, humanitarian aid. should that be reconsidered most recent actions against israel? >> with any aid you have to ask what it is doing, what goal is it advancing? we keep harping on both parties but seemingly hard the other israelis that we need to come to some sort of negotiation, get to the table have an agreement, petition agreement. i think we need to step back and realize the political factors in place for an agreement. if you have gaza run by hamas, starting wars with israel whenever you turn your back it's not going to lead to an agreement. we should be focusing on money and state on changing those political factors rather than writing these checks left and right. >> gregg: how do we can changes those political factors and what is the possibility in the near or distant future there could be a reconciliation and on the other hand gaza the palestinians there controlled by what is essentially a terrorist gro
nation that enacted democratic refo freed the most famous dissident it marked unambiguous foreign policy triumph for mr. obama and his secretary of state. the most well traveled in modern times. >> i could not be more grateful, not only for your service, hillary, but also for the powerful message that you send. >> but the obama administration no less than its preds so sors has been thoroughly vexed by the middle east, with the syrian regime quashing a two-year uprising that killed more than 30,000 people. where iran despite tough sanctions on the energy sector marches toward a nuclear weapons capability. and where the arab-israeli conflict festers, despite lofty talk from washington early on. >> today you will see an example of the kind of robust diplomacy that the president intends to pursue. >> clinton helped broker this month's truce between hamas and israel but ties with jerusalem frayed since 2009 and other danger spots such as north korea are no less dangerous than they were four years ago. >> she has a small legacy with burma, a positive. but she has a legacy with libya which is a
come together. on foreign policy issues, we shouldn't be playing politics. >> let me ask you, senator, if we can, let's go to the bottom line. can they block her? can she be can confirmed? >> the confirmation process is a very serious process t involves hearings and she should be judged on her record and what comes out at the hearings. i think so many senators have already prejudged her on information that i don't think is relevant to her capability to be secretary of state or whatever confirmation appointment that the president were to make. i would hope that the senators would withhold, allow the process to go forward. i think she has an outstanding record to present to the american people. >> are you willing to fight for that record? are democrats ready to dig in and fight if the president chooses to nominate ambassador rice? >> we want president obama's team in place as soon as possible. he won the election. we believe his team is entitled to the courtesy of the united states senate. there should be a processed and she should be judged on her record. >> senator ben cardin, thank y
on this, she will eventually be forced to relent. she does not have the experience on foreign policy. host: in this wall street journal era, it says the administration may have erred. there are different ways of treating the politics on doing that. you could argue that going in preemptively was a better course in some respects. the idea of a susan rice nomination is still something of a trial balloon, because the president has not said definitively that he wants to make her secretary of state. so this was sort of testing period to see if she could survive. at the same time, no one in the white house has denied that she is his favorite candidate. it could have gone on either way, frankly, yesterday, or at some point after he had already nominated her. host: newspapers are reporting susan rice will be meeting with susan collins of maine and senator bob corker of tennessee, who is in line to be the ranking republican on the senate foreign relations committee, which will hold confirmation hearings for secretary of state nominees. these three republicans would need more republicans to come to t
a long background of dealing in foreign policy issues. but she's also somebody who hasn't been willing to answer some of the hard questions that many of my colleagues have had regarding the situation in benghazi. and i think that demonstrates questions about her judgment and how she would be -- how independent she would be as secretary of state. that's obviously something very important in a secretary of state. >> let's talk about the fiscal cliff. the president and other folks are hoping for a deal by christmas. is it doable? >> i hope so. i think there's at least in my view an opportunity here for us to do something that's really good for the country. but it has to be -- it's got to be entitlement reform included in anything that we ultimately act on. we believe that in order to solve the country's fiscal solvency issues into the future, you've got to deal with the issue of entitlement reform. that's something so far the president has been reluctant to put on the table. so far what we've gotten out of him is this proposal to raise taxes which we think would be harmful to the economy.
which is very important for mexico, for the united states it's not seen as a foreign policy issue. it's seen as a domestic issue. for mexico it's extremely important, the relationship. to the extent there could be any progress on immigration reform in the united states, that would be very much welcome in mexico. >> suarez: as you note, security and drugs are both related and separate at the same time. but just when american voters in a couple of states have decriminalized the use of marijuana we're getting a new mexican president who had signaled during the campaign that he wanted to depart from his predecessor's policy on the war on drugs. as he said how he'll do that? >> he hasn't really spelled it out. we'll learn more once he's inaugurated on saturday and when he begins to pick his cabinet. but we do know that he's going to focus on reducing violence and not give as high a priority on drug enter diction and other kinds of goals that are related to the drug war in particular. i think these votes in colorado and washington state have not gone unnoticed in mexico. i think it's going
servants. >> rose: today the united states face as wave of foreign policy challenges, including the pressing question of how to respond to the potential use of chemical weapons by the assad government in syria, the government warned him of the consequence conditions consequences he could expect. >> i want to make it clear to assad and those under his command the world is watching, the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >>
ridiculed hillary clinton's foreign policy experience and called john mccain reckless and confused. if the president does nominate her, those who know susan rice well say she's more than up for the fight, and although it would be a bruising confirmation battle, she almost certainly would have the votes to be confirmed. jonathan karl, abc news, washington. >>> interesting parallel that story points out between condoleezza, confirmation process, and this one. "the washington post," interesting profile, i like the human nuggets they find. as u.n. ambassador she gained a reputation for sharp intellect. and sharp elbows. she is not known for diplomatic finesse, known for being aggressive sometimes too aggressive and using salty language on occasion. in private she has a good sense of humor. trying to dig up some humanity on her as well, but clearly she's a bulldog behind closed doors. >> they wouldn't indicate whether or not they would block the nomination if it gets to the point. the president has not nominated her to this point, we just want to make that clear. but some of the beef th
the fight with john tower in the first term. not a great way to start it. foreign policy is usually the time presidents get tripped up. it happened with truman and rgan and bush in iraq. foreign policy surprises can derail a second term. the president will have to be careful of benghazi. >> gretchen: you would think if they were concerned about legacy they would do things they know they can control. nick, thank you for your thoughts. >> thank you. >> gretchen: she should have died, the cheerleader who fell 40 feet from a window . he used the gun to save his boss. how was he rewarded? he was fired. happy birthday to johnnie resneck of the goo-goo dolls. he's 47. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> now that the election is over i am getting the impression that president obama is getting a little cocky. >> working to get public support for the tax and spending proposal. president obama answered questions on twitter. how will you stop us from going over the fiscal cliff and will it involve significant deficit reduction. the president said i thought twitter was supposed to be fun. where are all of the crazy video. tw
that so unsecured when the british left and everyone else. if we don't change our strategy from a foreign policy, change this lightfoot print approach to the war on terror there will be more benghazis. martha: what about that morning. i'm joined by kt macfarland. kt, it's so interesting. you watch these shows and you hear benghazi brought up. so often the reacross is get over it. move on. move on. why should we not move on? >> because that wham we did in 1998 when there were twin bombings in u.s. embassies in east africa and in 2000 when there was an attack against the u.s.s. cole in the region. what are we doing now? fast forward a decade. we have had attacks on american soil at consulate and americans had died. what are we doing? we are arguing with ourselves. we know where those died training camps are in eastern libya. why not go after them. what is the lesson al qaeda takes from this? once again no consequences. the americans will be fighting each other, not us. i think we allow them to become emboldened, and this is a green light for continuing to attack americans. martha: what do y
that he has on foreign policy in the republican senate caucus? mika and i talked to so many people over the past two, three years that say we want, republican senators, we want out of afghanistan but, you know what, we just sort of stay out of john's way. how many times have we heard that? >> a lot. it's disturbing. >> we hear it all the time. they stay out of his way. are they going to blindly follow and, again, i love and respect senator mccain, but i don't want my party to blindly follow him over a cliff on this battle especially if it's a personal one. >> well, on this battle it may be a personal one. i think the answer to your broader question is that republicans will continue to respect and follow his advice and syria is the next big issue that he is pounding away on. he was at a forum at the museum yesterday and crying out for american leadership on syria which means more engagement, more involvement. so there are a lot of big issues that he has huge influence on because of his experiences, his personal history. this issue i'm not so sure they'll follow him on. two of the three s
occasional disagreements on the conduct of foreign policy but i think it's been very rare that we have seen differently our views of how the department of defense should undertake its responsibilities. i'd also like to, as the subcommittee chair of the personnel subcommittee, i'd like to express my appreciation to our staff for all the work that they have done on this bill and the others. gary lelee, john clark, bri fire and jennifer knowles. they have been always accessible, extremely professional. it's been a great privilege to work with them. and i'd like a special moment of privilege here to recognize gordon peterson, who has been my military assistant through my time in the united states senate. gordon peterson and i graduated from the naval academy in the same year. he was a very fine and respected athlete at the naval academy. he went on to become a helicopter pilot in combat in vietnam. he gave our country 30 years of distinguished service as a naval officer. later was the editor-in-chief of "seapower" magazine, was special assistant to the commandant of the coast guard, and has bee
that a higher priority in your own foreign policy? >> the short answer would be yes. all those countries that you have listed, and more, certainly in terms of their economic capacity, compared to some of the smaller democracies, particularly some in the americas that have a long history of embracing democratic values, but they would not have the bankroll, if you will, to participate in international missions. again i, i keep using afghanistan as a touchstone, but there are 40 countries with boots on the ground. there are more than 60 that contribute on the development side. japan now, sweden. some of those democracies that are really in making a remarkable difference in the day-to-day lives of afghans. there are many ways where democracy can help spread democracy, which i think is a worthwhile endeavor and we would agree. there are different ways in which can engage non-militarily that are arguably going to have a much needed defect in parts of the world right now. in some of these troubled areas, it is clearly at a to pinpoint where development is not the issue. >> but someone has to pr
. that is the bipartisan tradition we need more of in washington, especially on foreign policy. as you prepare to leave the senate you love, i think i speak on behalf of everybody here and millions of people across the country when i say your legacy will endure in a safer and more secure world and a safer and more secure america. we pray this nation produces more leaders with your sense of decency and stability and integrity. we are grateful to you. thank you very much. [applause] i will point out it was the coup took me on my first foreign trip as a senator to russia, ukraine, and we were there to see the cooperative production program in action. the first thing i learned is when dick travels overseas, it is not a duncan. -- junkin. we did not stop and look at beautiful sights and lounge around. he wore out every 25-year-old staffoer. what you also learn is dick -- the more remote a place is, the more obscure the facility is, the bigger a rock star dick is. [laughter] they love him. i remember walking through one facility. i leaned in for a closer look. they said, do not touch that orange stuff. at an
this by you. i mean, isn't it part rice's personality the editor at large of foreign policy magazine describes rice this way, quote, she's not easy. i'm not sure i'd want to take her on a picnic with my family, but if the president wants her to be secretary of state, she'll work hard. this is from a reuters article. so is it in part that senators aren't used to dealing with a person -- i mean, susan rice just comes out and kind of says things. she's blunt. she's not charming, warm, etcetera. >> or maybe some might say diplomatic which you need for the role of secretary of state. you know, that might be part of it because, look, this is a club up here, a member of the club is somebody who wants that job. we're talking about senator john kerry who is the senate foreign relations chairman that might be sort of an under current here. i think the big issue when it comes to susan rice isn't so much her personality. it's that republican senators think that she is just too political. bob corker, who is meeting with her later this morning as well, he is a republican from tennessee, he said that she wou
life-saving assistance, whether they support children, strengthen food security or advance u.s. foreign policy. we also consider operational issues including efficient management and oversight. this case by case analysis ensures that there is careful consideration of the context surrounding a proposed activity. before the coup, usaid was the largest donor supporting leches in mali. programs trained poll workers and improved elections monitoring systems, strengthened political parties and provided voter education. when the electoral support activities resumed, providing the consent of congress, it will help support free an fair elections in mali and a peaceful political exit from the current situation. a key issue will be ensuring the inclusion and participation of the internally displaced personals and refugees in the political process. we plan to expand our elections assistance programming to include broader civic engagement activities, to support national reconciliation as part of the return to an inclusive democratic maliian society. the only usaid supported economic growth activitie
the foreign policy debate. the american people are on the side of the president and democrats who are making this case. that is not to say that there should not be spending as part as this debate. there has been over $1 trillion in spending cuts. that is a part of this debate that gets lost. just because washington has a short memory does not mean we should all have one and that there has already been sacrifice on behalf of the american people through those domestic discretionary cuts. we are excited. c.a.p. has been a lot of work on the fiscal cliff. we have talked about medicare savings that can improve and strengthen the program and address rising national health expenditures. we will have more to say on the issue of taxes. we are ecstatic to have senator durbin here today, who has played a fundamental role over the last several years. he has been part of every negotiation that has taken place. he is still an optimist. that is a sign of progress. he has had a long history of being a champion and advocate for the middle class. he has carried that advocacy in the budget negotiations. he was
add together administration's problem is a the president tries to assemble a foreign policy team for his second term. savannah. >> andrea mitchell in washington, thank you. >>> let's turn to chris matthews, host of msnbc's "hardball," chris, good morning to you. >> good morning, savannah. >> as andrea pointed all indications are that susan rice will be the pick for secretary of state and all indications are that it would be a very ugly confirmation battle. is it worth it for the president to take on this fight, and at this point, does he have any choice given how vigorously he's defended her? >> officially the white house has not made a decision yet. i was told last night right at the top over there they haven't made a decision yet, but he clearly has to get some separation it seems from the fight over what happened in benghazi, the testimony she gave on "meet the press" in mid-september was and the issue of picking secretary of state. if he can separate the two issues by a couple of weeks. if he has to make the nomination right in the middle of this, we'll have an opening act to
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)